Data from SEEK shows increase over last year.

Job Ads Rise in ANZ.

SEEK Employment Report data has found that new job ads nationally recorded a growth rate of 2.8 per cent while advertised salaries went up by four per cent, in October compared to a year ago. Kendra Banks, managing director of SEEK ANZ, said: “Earlier in the year we saw Victoria and New South Wales competing to be crowned Australia’s biggest contributor to job ad growth. What we are seeing now is a stark divergence between the two states, whilst NSW continues to post the majority of job ads their growth has remained flat, whereas Victoria is the undisputed engine of growth accounting for 48 per cent of positive job ad growth nationally.”

The October report highlights a growth in electrician roles over the past year, with a 66 per cent rise in Victoria and 20 per cent rise in New South Wales. In New South Wales, electricians are contributing to nearly half (48 per cent) of all trades and services job ad growth. Other industries contributing to growth include roles in gardening and landscaping (21 per cent), bakers and pastry chefs (6 per cent) and automotive trades accounting for six per cent of growth. For Victoria, nearly a quarter (23 per cent) of the ad growth in trades and services sector are for electricians. Other jobs experiencing growth in this sector include automotive trades (20 per cent) and plumbers (14 per cent).

Kendra explains: “Electricians require extensive training, skills and qualifications before they head into field. From speaking to recruiters in the trades and services industry, we know this field has strong, long-lasting career prospects.

“We know that automation is not negatively affecting job opportunities for electricians compared to other industries, due to the non-routine and problem-solving nature of their work,” she continues. “There is positive growth within the domestic and commercial markets for traditional electricians and a growing requirement for specialised AV technicians. The demand for electricians and pressure on candidate availability is being driven by the current, and projected, construction and infrastructure work across Victoria; where there is a focus on heavy industrial and specialised experience. To make sure we are meeting the demand for candidates we need to educate people on the exciting career prospects within the electrician trade and its longevity”

SEEK data shows employers having increased difficulty in attracting electrician candidates across New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and Victoria. Victoria has seen the biggest drop in candidate availability over the past year with a 37 per cent decrease.

Candidates within the electrician trade should expect an average annual salary of $82,700 in Australia. Western Australia offers the highest salary of over $102,000, with South Australia at the lowest salary of just under $74,000.

Michael Bateman, business manager – Victoria, Protech, comments: “Latest figures from the Department of Jobs and Small Business show that electricians are one of the top trades in Australia, employing over 158,000 candidates annually. In Victoria, construction projects in the residential, commercial and public infrastructure sectors have created strong demand for electricians.

“We are seeing this demand reflected in the candidates our clients are seeking, with more specialised skill sets expected of electricians to their relevant industry,” said Bateman. “For example, there is an increased requirement for High Voltage/Commissioning Technicians to service the demand in construction and infrastructure work, electricians with Data/AV Specialisations within Facility Management and for electricians in the facility maintenance and service industry, which service health care facilities and schools. We are also seeing a significant increase in demand for electrical apprentices within the Commercial industry for both general and data cabling work.”

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