Slavery and Trafficking stopped

GLAA secures first Risk Orders

The Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA) has had its first Slavery and Trafficking Risk Orders (STROs) granted at court to prevent a Romanian couple from trafficking vulnerable and exploited workers to the UK.

Orders were granted against Florin-Ciprian Dinu, 20, and Mihaela Dinu, 22, at Doncaster Magistrates’ Court on Wednesday August 12.

Evidence collected as part of investigations by the GLAA indicated that workers were at risk of being exploited through debt bondage, cramped accommodation, and even the threat of physical violence.

The judge approved the application by the GLAA for the STROs, stating that they were “proportionate and reasonable”, and that there was a risk the defendants would otherwise commit a slavery or trafficking offence.

The STROs impose strict restrictions on the pair, stopping them from arranging travel or transport into the UK for anyone other than their immediate family.

Other conditions set out in the orders prevent them from arranging employment for anyone other than themselves, using anyone else’s bank card, and renting or sub-letting any property they have unless it is to an immediate family member.

Both defendants, previously of Gladstone Street, Doncaster, have recently returned to Romania and were not present at court to contest the orders which will be in place until further notice.

GLAA Senior Investigating Officer Dave Powell said: “This is a really positive outcome which demonstrates the determination and professionalism from my team to use all the tools at our disposal to prevent labour abuse.

“The orders imposed first and foremost are about protecting vulnerable workers from slavery and trafficking. Treating workers as commodities is completely unacceptable and will not be tolerated by our agency under any circumstances.

“We will closely monitor these orders to ensure that they are being fully adhered to and that our communities are kept safe from the risks of modern slavery and labour exploitation.”

Breaching the order is a criminal offence carrying a maximum penalty of five years in prison.

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